A Review of Lil Wayne’s Funeral

The album name is fitting because Lil Wayne just killed his career.

Lil Wayne has been producing immaculate rap music since his debut album, “The Block is Hot” in 1999. Wayne’s work has been a staple in the rap world for over a decade, but his new album, Funeral, has officially dethroned him. Due to its lack of his usual lyrical ingenuity and solid beats, it’s bittersweet to declare my resignation from his fanbase, but also an absolute necessity. 

Let’s begin by dissecting the first track, “Funeral”. As soon as this song came on, I heard that familiar lighter click that Wayne begins every album with. Usually, a sound that ensures the next 3 minutes will fill you up with energy, this song lacked that usual hype Wayne brings to his tracks. It takes an entire minute and thirty-four seconds of a gospel and classical hybrid beat until Lil Wayne finally spits bars. In truth, he’s not even spitting bars per se, but you have to take what you can get with this album. 

He seems to be pushing into a new wave of rap, reflecting on his jail stint and bad parenting skills instead of the glamorous life of a celebrity.”

The album peaks early with the first few tracks. Although Funeral doesn’t hold a candle to Wayne’s finest work, it does contain some pretty solid lines. The verse, “Money on my mind, so I usually overthink/ Yeah I’m runnin out of time so I bought another Rollie” really encompasses the familiar poised tone we Lil Wayne fans have come to love. However, I can’t give him too much credit for the lyrics on this album because he then goes to say, “Droppin’ these jewels, it’s precious like I’m droppin’ my jewelry”. We understood it the first time, he did not have to repeat that he dropped his jewelry. 

Not only is Lil Wayne lacking on this album, but so are his features. Personally, I think Lil Wayne, Meek Mill, and Kendrick Lamar are like the Holy Trinity of rap music. So naturally, it’d be ideal to hear rappers with that kind of intensity on this album. Apparently, that is asking far too much because instead, Wayne gave us Adam Levine. The same Adam Levine who suburban soccer moms went crazy for during the 2019 Super Bowl halftime show. Big Sean also made an appearance on this tracklist which literally baffled me. Has Big Sean even dropped a song since 2016? If someone told me that guy changed his name and moved to Cuba, I would believe them. One would think a rap legend like Lil Wayne would have no trouble getting the best up-and-coming rappers on one of his albums, but evidently, Funeral was bound to flop before it was even released. 

I’m not the only Lil Wayne fan disappointed with his recent excuse for an album either. When I asked my fellow rap enthusiast Megan Robinson how she felt about the album, she said, “Funeral is straight up just not good…we also could get so hype to his old music but now I can’t even listen to a full song.” There was no better feeling than leaving the school parking lot the day of prom blasting Wayne’s classic oldies like “Right Above It.” That song is like the Sweet Caroline of the 2010s but with more profanity. It’s sad to say, but I’m sure many Lil Wayne fans would agree, he peaked in 2013. 

The verse, “Money on my mind, so I usually overthink/ Yeah I’m runnin out of time so I bought another Rollie” really encompasses the familiar poised tone we Lil Wayne fans have come to love.”

Lil Wayne’s previous album, Tha Carter V, seems to be the last piece his fanbase can hold onto. He seems to be pushing into a new wave of rap, reflecting on his jail stint and bad parenting skills instead of the glamorous life of a celebrity. I guess it’s more raw but also, that’s not what I signed up for. I’d listen to Miley Cyrus if I wanted to hear that kind of stuff. I should have bumped more Lil Wayne when he was still young and fun, but you never really appreciate what you have until it’s gone.

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