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Dakota Access Pipeline: Fast Facts

Razor wire and concrete barriers protect access to the Dakota Access pipeline drilling site Thursday, Feb. 9, 2017 near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. The developer says construction of the Dakota Access pipeline under a North Dakota reservoir has begun and that the full pipeline should be operational within three months. One of two tribes who say the pipeline threatens their water supply on Thursday filed a legal challenge asking a court to block construction while an earlier lawsuit against the pipeline proceeds. (AP Photo/James MacPherson)

AP Photo/James MacPherson

Razor wire and concrete barriers protect access to the Dakota Access pipeline drilling site Thursday, Feb. 9, 2017 near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. The developer says construction of the Dakota Access pipeline under a North Dakota reservoir has begun and that the full pipeline should be operational within three months. One of two tribes who say the pipeline threatens their water supply on Thursday filed a legal challenge asking a court to block construction while an earlier lawsuit against the pipeline proceeds. (AP Photo/James MacPherson)

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Over the past several weeks, there has been much discussion on the news and on social media surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline and protests fighting against it. With all of the biased reports and rumors spreading on platforms such as Twitter and Facebook, developing your own opinion on the subject can prove to be difficult. Here are some questions that you might be asking yourself and here are the facts:

What company or group is building the pipeline?

  • The company is called Dakota Access, LLC. It is also known as DAPL. This company is a smaller part of a company named Energy Transfer Partners (ETP).

What would the pipeline do?

  • The purpose of the pipeline is to increase domestic crude oil production, which would hopefully create greater energy independence for the United States. America is the 3rd largest producer of oil, but the top consumer of it.
  • The pipeline has been designed to transport around 470,000 barrels of crude oil each day.
  • It would also hopefully aid some transportation shortages for agriculture and other industries in the area.

How would it be made? 

  • The pipeline would require millions of hours of labor, including the work of mechanics, welders, electricians, pipe fitters and more.
  • It would cost approximately $3.7 billion.

Where would it be?

  • The plan for the pipeline would be from the North Dakota Bakken region to Illinois, through South Dakota and Iowa.
  • It would span over 50 counties and be in 4 states.
  • As stated on the DAPL Pipeline Facts website, “As permits are filed, the route is still subject to change slightly in order to accommodate the individual needs and concerns of landowners along the route.”

When did the protests start? 

  • Protests in the area began around late July of 2016.
  • July also when attorneys for the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe began working to stop the pipeline from being built.

Why are they protesting? 

  • The Standing Rock Sioux tribe cited a “high risk that culturally and historically significant sites will be damaged or destroyed”.
  • The route of the pipeline would lead to the disturbance of sacred lands and burial grounds.
  • They fear for the environment impact that the pipeline would have. It would likely harm the Missouri River, which supplies the drinking water for this tribe and other people/animals living in the area.

Who is protesting?

  • The Standing Rock Sioux tribe has led protesting, but many other tribes have joined them.
  • Those present at the site include representatives of over 200 additional tribes.
  • Over 1.6 million people have “checked in” at the reservation on Facebook as an act of solidarity with Standing Rock Sioux tribe.

What do they want?

  • The protesters asked for a temporary injunction against construction.
  • They do not want the pipeline built on the land there.

How have protesters been treated? 

  • Approximately 141 protesters were arrested.
  • Law enforcement officials have used pepper spray, tear gas, and sound cannons on protestors.

What’s the verdict as of now? 

  • During the week of December 4th, the United States Department of the Army announced that it does not approve of the crossing of the pipeline under the Missouri River.

This image is of the planned route. It is from the DAPL Pipeline Facts website.

This image displays one of the protests against the DAPL.

Sources and where to find out more: 

http://www.daplpipelinefacts.com/

http://abcnews.go.com/US/timeline-dakota-access-pipeline-protests/story?id=43131355

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/dakota-access-protests-facts-facebook_us_5818baece4b064e1b4b4e3cf

http://www.sciencealert.com/that-thing-the-standing-rock-protesters-were-afraid-of-just-happened

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Dakota Access Pipeline: Fast Facts