Your Afro, Your Crown: A Look at How Gen Z is Embracing Afro Culture

Dove US

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The representation of Afro Culture has been seen all throughout the world. Gen Z is confidently embracing and proudly representing their heritage. A lot of you may be wondering: what really is Afro Culture? Afro is defined as “a thick hairstyle consisting of very tight curls that sticks out all around the head, like the natural hair of some black people” and culture is defined as “the customs, arts, social institutions, and achievements of a particular nation, people, or other social group.” This means that Afro Culture can only be the achievements, growth, and unique differences of black culture cultivated by the term afro because of black people’s hair texture.

Today, the appreciation of Afro Culture has grown dramatically, with many fashion designers representing their culture through clothing design or artists including the legendary Carters with the album Everything is Love.

Afro Culture can only be the achievements, growth, and unique differences of the black culture cultivated by the term afro because of black people’s hair texture.”

Afro Culture, also known as a black culture, goes way back to the time of when slavery began. The culture of African Americans/blacks is originally rooted in Africa. Although I would not like to dive deeply into the civil rights movement, Afro Culture was formed during the times of great horror and sadness for people of color. Throughout these times our ancestors held tight to the values intertwined with Black identity. From our music, starting with Jazz from the great Duke Ellington during the Harlem Renaissance, to the Black Power Movement of the 1960s and 1970s led by Malcolm X, Afro Culture has been a source of pride for Blacks/African Americans. The Black Lives Matter movement is a new iteration of this trend; it is characterized by activism and nonviolent protest, forging a new sense of community amongst Black men and women in America. The movement is rooted in the same historical trauma at the center of the Harlem Renaissance and Black Power Movement.

The Black Lives Matter movement is a new iteration of this trend; it is characterized by activism and nonviolent protest, forging a new sense of community amongst Black men and women in America. ”

As a woman of color living in this generation, I can presently see the Black movement growing, with Gen Z-ers joining in daily. That is why it is important to know the origins and evolution of Afro Culture: from Obama being elected in 2008, as the first black president of the United States, to Trayvon Martin’s death in 2012, and New York finally deciding to ban hair segregation in schools and in the workplace. Afro Culture is changing the world–musically, legally, and through fashion.

Gen Z’s embracing of this rich culture would have not been possible if designers and artists did not lead with the same pride their ancestors did. Pride in Afro Culture gives young people  the confidence required to not be ashamed of their culture and fight against stereotypes. Gen Z are more than ever diving deeply into their self love and the world is openly accepting our cultural ways. Young people are often at the root of important social change–today is no different.

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